Sep
04
2009
0

Moving emails from Mac Mail back to Outlook on Windows

Although both Apple and Microsoft say it’s easy moving between their platforms, things aren’t as easy as they seem.

You can struggle for hours trying to move your data. I’ve tried conversion tools and some emails always fail. The best method is to take advantage of IMAP, which will let you store emails on a server, then download them again.

If your ISP doesn’t give you an IMAP account, there are Lots of webmail providers such as gmail can give you an IMAP account.

Once you’re set up, just drag the emails into the IMAP folder and they will upload to the server.

Now, just configure your new client and download the emails. Done!

If you are worried about privacy, you can download and install hmailserver, create an account on that and then just send the messages to your local server.

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips,PC Tips |
Jun
15
2009
0

Sandisk Cruzer – Making them work like a standard USB stick

I just brought an 8GB Sandisk Cruzer USB stick. Unfortunately whenever you plug it in, it comes up as both an emulated CD-ROM drive and the removable disk. the emulated disk comes up as “U3 System” and it tries to run backup/sync software called U3 Launchpad.

Some people enjoy these extra “benefits”, but I’m not a big fan of the bundled software and just want 8GB of storage space I can call home.

If you want to remove the built in software and just use it as a memory stick, you’ll want to use the U3 LaunchPad Remover from Sandisks’ Website. The link to it is: http://www.sandisk.com/driverdownload/download.asp?driverId=2

Written by John in: General Randomness,Mac OS X Tips,PC Tips |
Feb
09
2009
0

Mac OS X – Developer toolbar in Safari

Did you know that the latest version of Safari has a built in developer toolbar?

You can change your user-agent, disable styles, disable javascript, etc?

It even has a nifty network timeline so you can see how big your pages are and what the delays are.

It even has a nifty network timeline so you can see how big your pages are and what the delays are.

(more…)

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips |
Jan
21
2009
6

Mac OS X – Remote Desktop Client UK Keyboard Bug Fix

I use the Microsoft Remote Desktop Client (Version 2.0.0 Beta 3) to connect to a number of Windows machines from my Mac laptop.

There is one very annoying ‘feature’ when using the Remote Desktop Client with a MacBook with a UK Keyboard – Whenever you use shift + arrow to highlight text, the Remote Desktop Client sends a delete signal and deletes one character to the right of the cursor.

I’ve since found a very useful fix for this – Set your keyboard layout to US.

There is only one key combination change which is that hash and pound (As in the currency) are reversed – Shift + 3 will do a hash and Alt + 3 will do a pound. This does have another benefit… when using the RDP Client on a UK Mac keyboard, you do not have access to the hash character.

You have the ability to add an icon to quickly change the layout from the menu bar.

Here is how you do it.

1. Open System Preferences and Select International

2. Select the Input Menu Tab

3. Scroll down the list and tick U.S. and then at the bottom of the window select Show input menu in menu bar (Screen grab below)

international

4. Close the international tab.

5. You should now have a picture of a flag in your menu bar. If you click it you can quickly change between the UK and US keyboard layouts. (Screen grab below)

international2

As said earlier, the only layout change for common keys is that hash(#) and pound (£) are swapped.

Let me know if this makes your life easier.

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips |
Dec
17
2008
0

Mac OS X – Changing the default application for files

I’ve never had any trouble finding where to set the default application for a specific file, but it took me a while to find out how to set it for an entire file type.

To set the default application for a single file you simply select the file, right click it, select “Open with” and then select “Other”.

Select Other to be able to define the default application for a single file

Select Other to be able to define the default application for a single file

You will now see a window similar to the one below.
default_app_2

You can now select the application you want to open it with. Finally select the “Always open with” checkbox and click open.

This file (and only this file) will now open with the new default application.

If you want to set an entire file type to open with a new default application, select one of the files and either press Command+I or right click and select “Get Info”. You should see something resembling the following.

default_app_3

Scroll down to the section “Open with” and expand it if required. Select the application from the list – If it’s not there you can once again select “Other” and go through the process of finding the application. Once you have the correct application selected in the list, simply click “Change All” and this will change default application for all files of that type.

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips |
Dec
16
2008
0

Upgrading Mac OS X from 10.5.5 to 10.5.6

Apple recently released an update to Mac OS X 10.5.6

I have a Macbook pro with everything standard except for 4GB of RAM. I was currently running OS X 10.5.5 and thought the update would be somewhat trivial.

To cut a long story short, the install kept freezing at the start of the update saying “Configuring Installation”.

I found no disk errors and after a few more attempts gave up on this upgrade method.

I decided to try the manual standalone method and downloaded the (668MB) combo update from Apple’s website (I never bothered to try the standard update).

Mission Accomplished!

Mission Accomplished!

So if you’re having the same problem, try the standalone updater, available from http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/apple/macosx_updates/macosx1056update.html.

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips |
Dec
06
2008
0

Mac OS X – Changing the default search from google.com

In the tope right corner of Safari is a search box that says Google. Anything you type into this box is searched from google.com (At least on my macbook).

There is no way using normal user options to change this from google.com. Back in the good old days ™ you could edit the Safari binary file with vi and change the link, but as of current versions, this cannot be done.

I’m sure Apple have their reasons for forcing the search engine to Google. It sends safari as an extra field in the querystring so I can only guess that Apple make money for every search made using that box. Furthermore, if you try and change your homepage to google, Safari will pop up with the following friendly message.

Dammit Apple, I just want to use google.co.uk from my toolbar – I don’t care how much money you make from it, surely you make the same money if I use google.com or google.co.uk. If anything, Google’s adverts are more geographically targeted when I use the UK alternative.

After a lot of searching to fix/hack the result I want, it seems no-one has been successful.

Enter Inquisitor…

Inquisitor replaces the Safari Google search box with a new one.

The search box returns suitable results while you type and offers autocomplete. Hitting enter will always forward you to the selected search engine.

A new settings tab appears in Safari Preferences allowing you to customise the search box.

More than anything, I can now search direct on google.co.uk from the safari toolbar.

Thanks for nothing Apple.

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips |
Dec
05
2008
0

Importing outlook emails into Mac Mail

As part of the transition process from a PC to a Mac, I needed to move all my emails from the Outlook pst file to the folder/file format used in Mac Mail.

I came across an incredibly useful tool from little machines. The tool is called O2M (Outlook to Mail) and for only US$10, it’s a steal.

It also moves your contacts and calendar entries too so is very flexible.

I don’t know of a free or open source tool to do this. If someone knows of one, please contact me.

Note: I have to relationship whatsoever with Little Machines apart from being a happy (registered) user of their software.

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips |
Nov
17
2008
0

A Mac OS X Dashboard Widget I can't live without – iStat Pro

iStat Pro is one of the most useful “task monitors” for an apple.

I don’t even know where to start describing how useful it is. It even tells me the charge level on my wireless bluetooth mouse.

Here is a screengrab from it (click to zoom in)

Get yourself a copy now from http://islayer.com/apps/istatpro/

It’s free, but donations are recommended.

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips |
Nov
15
2008
0

Force Quitting Applications in Mac OS X

Yes, Mac applications hang. Normally you can click on the  in the top left corner of the screen and select “Force Quit”.

But what about keyboard shortcuts?

As shown in the image above,  ⌘ + ⌥ + ESC will bring up the window.

But add in the Shift key for instant kill gratification.

Using ⇧ + ⌘ + ⌥ + ESC will close the current active application immediately without bringing up the window.  Note that you can’t force quit finder like this.  Instead, to kill the finder you will still need to go through the normal window and select it from the list.

Written by John in: Mac OS X Tips |